Natanya 2

Natanya

At this week’s all-staff meeting, our CEO Farzad Mostashari repeated one phrase again and again. “At Aledade,” he said, “we’re thinking long term.”  

Our work at Aledade helps physicians, patients, and society today, but we’re always looking ahead three years, six years, and even more. A focus on the future resonates in our values and the work we do every day.  In fact, the Aledade Fellows program is born from this long-term thinking. By joining the Aledade team as recent graduates or current students, we have the opportunity to learn what it takes to be the value-based health care champions of the future.

Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel’s new book, Prescription for the Future is similarly forward-thinking. In it, he argues for a positive prognosis for the U.S. health care system – but a prognosis that relies on disseminating a variety of transformational practices to raise the quality and lower the cost of health care.  

At Aledade, we partner with practices to implement these high-value practices every day.  Chronic care management that cares for a whole patient. Wellness visits that take into account a patient’s experience outside the doctor’s office. Referral management that steers patients to high-value specialists. And transitional care management that eases a patient’s discharge from the hospital. These are all initiatives that Aledade undertakes today. They’re practices we’ll keep improving on with an eye toward the future.

What Prescription for the Future offers us, as young people involved in the transformative work that Dr. Emanuel describes, is an understanding of Aledade within the greater context of the movement toward a value-based health care system. His book reminds us that the work we do is integral to that  movement, and that we are not alone in looking to the future.

But I wasn’t the only fellow who learned some valuable lessons from Dr. Emanuel’s work. Below are some additional insights from three Aledade fellows:

 

MargotMargot

In chapter eight, Dr. Emanuel asks the question, “Is transformed healthcare transferable?” In other words, can we replicate high-value care success stories across the country?

He points to factors such as cultural, social, and economic histories as the primary barriers to transferring care. Considering these barriers, it seems to me an organization like Aledade is uniquely positioned to transfer high-value care to patients across the country. With a large network focused on collecting quality data, Aledade is equipped to identify successful ideas and scale them among its partner practices. Coupled with this, and equally essential, is Aledade’s emphasis on local physician leadership.

Our partner practices have the independence and flexibility to adopt successful ideas in ways that fit their communities. Care management in Mississippi is not the same care management performed in New York. Ultimately, practices are accountable for the care of their patients, and practices have the grassroots knowledge to transform care for their patients.

 

Doug Streat1 - Edit

Doug

At Aledade, as in health care in general, we have a tendency to use industry buzzwords to describe what we do. Phrases like “value-based” and “patient-centered (and, scarier yet, our alphabet soup of acronyms like ACO, AAPM, CCM) dominate our conversations. This isn’t necessarily bad—we love our work—but it can be hard to explain exactly what is that we do, and why we do it. Dr. Emanuel’s Prescription for the Future is as much a formula for transformation as it is a chronicle of stories that clearly explain the future we are working to achieve.

The future we envision is good for patients. It is one where patients like Miss Harris in chapter one don’t need six providers to manage their care or, if they do, receive seamless care coordination among these providers. The future we imagine is one where patients have ready access to community interventions, like Mr. Downs in chapter six did. The future we are creating is one where primary care providers are so readily available, that their patients don’t need to go to the ED as often.

The future is good for providers, too. The future we are striving for stands on strong technological infrastructure that supports, but does not replace, the work of medical providers, as discussed in chapter seven. The future we seek is one where primary care providers can create improved care and improved bottom line at the same time, as one of our partners in West Virginia, Julie DeTemple, reported to us when she spoke at our all-staff retreat this May.

These transformations, and the others Dr. Emanuel writes about, will help stabilize health care costs and improve practices at a systemic level. In so doing, we hope to build a future that is good for society, too.

 

KellyKelly

As a widely-contested health care reform proposal dominates national news coverage, reading Dr. Zeke Emmanuel’s “Prescription for the Future” was both uplifting and insightful. Each day since I started at Aledade, I have gained a deeper understanding of the United States’ health care system. But arguably the most important thing that I have taken away is a new perspective on the future of health care.

Working alongside a passionate team dedicated to value-based care, a team that is growing every day, has shown me that health care providers are constantly innovating to improve the quality of care delivered nationwide.

I found the chapter on “Transforming Physician Office Infrastructure” particularly interesting and enjoyed reading the section about measuring and releasing unblinded physician performance data. Dr. Emanuel’s explanation of the effectiveness in releasing this data lies in the principle of peer comparisons, from behavioral economics. Physicians, like all humans, are wired to avoid embarrassment in front of their peers, so releasing unblinded data on their performance motivates changes in underperformance. In one story that Dr. Emanuel features, a physician notes:

“As soon as the system started generating data, I remember my own thought was, ‘This is silly. I know I am going to do great on this performance review.’ And then I saw my data. Holy cow, not nearly as good as I thought. Knowing made me realize, ‘Hey we’ve got to be sharing this data.’ But more importantly made me ask, ‘Who is doing the best?’ I need to look at that person and say, ‘What are you doing? How do you do it so well?’” (p.83)

By looking at positive outliers in performance data and assessing what exactly these outliers do better, providers can deliver better care as individuals and practices. That’s why, at Aledade, we analyze and provide quality metric performance and cost data to our providers, both at the ACO and the practice level. We take this one step further by providing practice support through a field team that works directly with practices to decrease their total cost of care and achieve higher quality performance.

My favorite part about working at Aledade is hearing provider success stories, like the one above that Dr. Emanuel features, shared by our field team after implementing Aledade’s resources in our ACO practices. They prove to me that health care professionals around the country are already making incredible progress, and building the future of health care today.

 

Natanya

Natanya

It is not always easy to explain Aledade’s work, and our work as Aledade Fellows, to our family and friends. With healthcare news dominating the airwaves and Twitter feeds recently, it can be tough to make clear how Aledade fits into all of these changes.  

While the answers to these questions are complex, the goal of everyone involved in the value-based transformation is relatively simple: We want to see a future with lower health care costs and higher quality care. At Aledade, we achieve that by partnering with practices and physicians to make that transition from volume toward value.

After all, an alidade is a device used for determining direction. In our case, we’re aiming our sights on a future with better outcomes for patients, providers, and society. Prescription for the Future has given us a peek into where others are aiming their sights. After reading it, I believe we’re not the only ones thinking long term, and that when we converge on the future, it’s going to be bright.