President Trump’s administration has made it clear that they plan to greatly alter, if not repeal, the Affordable Care Act. To both sides of the political isle it may come as a surprise that altering the Affordable Care Act will likely have little impact on a core outcome of health reform: the fact that private insurance companies increasingly pay primary care providers for improved health outcomes. Since the presidential election, we have met with a dozen payers in both red and blue states: Arkansas, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Utah, and West Virginia. Not one payer has mentioned that they plan to stop their efforts, or pull back resources dedicated to moving physicians away from the fee-for-service paradigm and towards paying for outcomes. In fact, every payer we meet is intent to continue to innovate by paying providers in a manner that lowers cost and improves health.

A key piece of the Affordable Care Act created the Medicare Shared Savings Program, and private payers quickly followed with their own efforts to move physicians to shared savings contracts. Years later, private payers continue to dedicate significant resources to move providers away from fee for service and towards value payments. And payers have committed to move all of their providers, across all business lines (commercial, Medicare Advantage, and Managed Medicaid), to value. This investment has been significant. For example, Cigna established CareAllies, a service company that works with provider organizations of all types to focus on improved patient outcomes and better health care quality and affordability. Similarly, UnitedHealthcare (via Optum) has gone further and purchased providers in order to create high value networks and their own Accountable Care Organizations. Humana has a well-established value path (the Accountable Care Continuum) that moves its Medicare Advantage providers away from fee for service on a path towards global capitation. Each of these national payers have undertaken vast strategic efforts that require significant resources for staff and infrastructure, and a change in culture.

Commercial payers believe, and have the data to demonstrate, that paying for value lowers their cost and improves the health of their members. For example, UnitedHealthcare has noted up to 6 percent lower medical costs across a range of value-based care programs, and overall, commercial ACOs have lower expenses per Medicare enrollee and slightly higher quality-of-care scores.

Despite the threat of repealing parts or all of the Affordable Care Act, our payer partners continue to move ahead with their payment reform efforts. The political battle over Obamacare has had no impact on payers’ dedication to reform provider payments; the future of primary care provider payment remains value-based. Though there is still much unknown about the potential repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act, the future of physician payment reform is clear.